How Google hire software engineers

Vadim Lobarev

Google is one of the most attractive companies to spend your software engineering career. So if you are a software developer who is interested in working at Google, knowing how Google hire engineers will give you a big advantage.

Software Engineers at Google have the opportunity to work on some of the hardest problems in computer science, building everything from large-scale distributed systems to messing around with cool hardware.

They work in small teams, often with a great degree of freedom. Good software engineers are good at communicating and motivating others to join them on their adventures and to help them learn new things. They enjoy brainstorming and singing while they code.

Google uses a mix of interviews.

A phone interview. The phone interview is on average 30-45 minutes and covers basic questions like your background and experience. You may be asked to solve a coding question on the whiteboard, but it’s not essential.

A live coding session with an engineer, where you write code in front of him/her. They will probably ask you to write some code on the board so they can see how fast you type and how well you navigate through your IDE (Integrated Development Environment). After that, they might ask for more complicated problems that take more than one step.

A take-home assignment. This is a very important part of the process because it gives Google a chance to see what kind of work you do when nobody is watching over your shoulder. It also gives them a chance to see how well you communicate with others over email or chat because they’ll ask questions about it later on in the process if they like what they see from this assignment.

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The process is designed to assess problem-solving and coding ability.

Google’s hiring process is well-documented as one of the toughest in Silicon Valley. It takes about six months from first contact to hire, and candidates are often asked to complete a coding test before even getting an interview.

The process starts with an online application that asks candidates for their resume, cover letter, and GitHub account. Then, Google sends a set of programming questions via email, which takes about an hour to complete. Candidates have 24 hours to complete each question set (two or three sets per candidate).

The next phase is the phone interview, which lasts 30 minutes and involves a series of technical questions designed to test your knowledge of computer science fundamentals like data structures and algorithms. You’ll also be asked questions about why you want to work at Google, what excites you about technology and what projects you’ve worked on in the past.

The final phase is an onsite interview at one of Google’s offices with multiple engineers from multiple teams — typically two or three people per team. Each interviewer will ask you several technical questions related to their field of expertise (e.g., software engineering or infrastructure).

The first interview consists of the recruiter asking questions.

The first interview consists of the recruiter asking questions. This is done on the phone and is usually pretty simple, such as “What’s your favorite programming language?” or “What’s your favorite algorithm?”

The second interview always involves whiteboarding.

The second interview consists of a whiteboard interview with two software engineers. The candidate will be asked to solve some problems on a whiteboard, including design questions and coding questions.

At this stage, Google has decided that you’re worth talking to, but they’re not ready to make an offer yet.

Every interviewer is a working engineer.

They’re interviewing you because they’re interested in solving problems, and they want to see how you solve them. That’s why ерун don’t ask for specific technologies or languages in the interview — it’s about how you think, not what you know.

Every interviewer is different, too: some may ask you more technical questions, while others may ask more about your past experiences. What matters most is that you’re able to demonstrate your problem-solving abilities in whatever way the interviewer asks for it.

The third interview involves more coding questions and a take-home programming project.

The take-home assignment is similar to the one you might have had at school: write a program that sorts a list of numbers. However, at Google it isn’t as simple as just sorting them in ascending order; you also need to handle several other edge cases correctly (e.g., if there are duplicates).

You are welcome to ask questions during the interview process as well. However, if you ask too many questions then there will be no time left for them to ask you any more questions!

If you pass this round successfully, then congratulations! You’ve been offered a job!

If you are looking for a job and interested in vacancies not only in Google, please check the vacancies we have.

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Takeaway:

You can best prepare by understanding Google’s process and knowing that they want you to succeed!